A trademark of the Fédération des gestionnaires de rivières à saumon du Québec
Fishing

Causapscal River

Information

Contact information

Address
84, rue St-Germain Est, bureau 2080, Rimouski (Québec), G5L 1A6
Phone
418 722-3726
Free Phone
1-866-972-8666
Email
info@saumonquebec.com

Annual statistics

Moon phase

Moon phases

River Condition(s)

A summary

  • Length: 61 km, of which 31 km are open to fishing
  • Sectors and pools: 25 pools in 2 limited-access sectors
  • Type of fishing:Wade and canoe fishing for salmon
  • Fishing season: May 15 to July 15
  • Daily catch limit per angler: 1 large salmon (63 cm or more)

 

Salmon fishing on the Causapscal River

At 61 kilometres long, the Causapscal River has its source in the lake of the same name and flows through the Matapedia Valley before merging with the Matapedia River in the heart of the town of Causapscal. The Causapscal River is home to some of Quebec's largest salmon.

The history of sport fishing on this river is intimately linked with a Scot named George Stephen, who became Lord Mount Stephen in 1891, and a Quebecer named Richard Nelson Adams. A cofounder of the Canadian Pacific Railway, Stephen rented the Matapedia and Causapscal rivers and purchased 6 lots there. As for Adams, his work as a guide on these waters in the 20th century earned him an international reputation. Corporation de gestion des rivières Matapédia et Patapédia, which has managed sport fishing on the Causapscal since 1992, created the Richard Adams Foundation, which conducts scientific research into salmon and works to protect the species in the region.

Every year starting in late May, some 450 to 600 salmon enter the Causapscal River, which is divided into 2 limited-access sectors that cover a total of 31 kilometres and include 25 pools. Access passes are limited to 4 rods per sector, per day, and anglers normally fish from a canoe. A guide is required in sector 2. The naturally brownish waters often turn darker after a heavy rain. Large stones cover the river bottom. The current is swift during the spring runoff but becomes more moderate during the summer months.

Renowned for its large salmon, this spectacular waterway is also celebrated for its tranquility and breathtaking landscapes. The town of Causapscal is home to Matamajaw, a former angler's club that has been converted into Quebec's only museum exclusively dedicated to sport fishing for salmon.

 

Note

  • The annual statistics are provided by the Government of Quebec.